Sundays in Tokyo

Every day is an adventure here but Sundays allow you to see a bit more than usual as people have quality time with themselves, their families, friends, pets, and can dress as they fancy. What do you think of this one?

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Yokohama

Here is the 2nd largest city in Japan, in fact, you cannot really see the limit between Tokyo and Yokohama as they both grew so big that it is now a huge metropolis.

Door-to-door, it takes me an hour to go there. Many metro lines in Tokyo become suburb train lines and quite a few go to Yokohama, I usually take the Namboku metro line that continues to it.

Yokohama is know for

  • the shopping malls
  • the bay
  • the amusement park in Minato Mirail
  • the stadium for large events
  • Chinatown

It is closer to Haneda than Tokyo is for most areas.

 

Election Day

Last week, October 22nd, were the general elections in Japan. Although a typhoon was going across the country that day, many people paid a visit to the poll.

On that Sunday morning, I was very impressed and even stressed out as a general announcement came over Tokyo. Since the announcement was made in Japanese, I was unsure whether it was about the typhoon security measures and what to do. Fortunately, the end of the call expressed in English that this was a reminder that people should go to vote!

All cities are equipped with public speakers to conduct drills in case of earthquakes and over disasters, very impressive for me but also quite stressful

 

Dealing with Japan

What an interesting read about cultural differences and ways of doing business and integrating. Highly recommended, 38pages so it takes a while but I took it in steps to let it sink and it is worth. Japan communication

Kanazawa market

Everyday life, food and people, are the things I am mostly interested in when visiting a country, of course the history, the monuments and museums are great but a country is defined by his people and society.

When visiting the Kanazawa Omicho market, … look at the size of the oysters!!

 

Kanazawa

Kanazawa is located 2h40 north west of Tokyo with the shinkansen. Many people call it the “small Kyoto” although locals would challenge this. they tell you that Kyoto is about Emperors while Kanazawa is about Samourai.

This city is not hitted as hard by earthquakes and has suffered as much from the wars therefore you can still find a lot of wooden houses and traditional constructions, along with shrines and monuments, plenty of tiny streets. It is very touristic. I found a lot of Europeans (French and Italian) and Americans (Canada and US) and hardly any Chinese or Koreans which is unusual these days in Japan.

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The city is known for the glass, they cut glass in a beautiful way, it became also a trademark as some corporations produce glass for the industry with very tech-saavy methods and the city has become a hot spot for automotive and aviation industries who come here for some of their tools.

Kanazawa is also known as the city of gold. you can even buy golden ice creams!! as you can see below, ice cream with a thin golden sheet over it, very funny (but tasteless)

Shinkansen started operating to Kanazawa a couple of years ago, and, since, it made a huge difference, the number of visitors had a boom and hotels are popping up like mushrooms. It had a massive and positive economical impact although the city feels a bit packed at times because of this.

Teppanyaki

It is always a unique experience to go to teppanyaki. This week, I was lucky to go again to Akasaka Restaurant, food is exquisite, preparation is a show, it is truly a special moment although very pricey. This can only be done on special occasions